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ISA+21

 
Thirty-eight years ago, twenty-one women airline pilots started ISA+21.
With members from regional and major airlines, we are over 400 strong!
 
 
 
Claudia Simpson Jones, Denise Blankinship, Jean Harper, Maggie Rose Stryker, Beverley Bass,
Gail Gorski, Mary Bush Shipko, Karen Kahn, Sharon Hilgers Krask, Terry London Rinehart,
Angela Masson, Lennie Sorenson, Stephanie Wallach, Norah O'Neill, Sandra Donnelly, Holly Fulton, Jane Bonny, Lynn Rhoades.

Missing from photo: Emily Warner, Val Cottle Walker, Julie Clark
 
 
Why ISA+21
 
ISA is an acronym for International Standard Atmosphere. The appendage of +21, acknowledges the original 21 members.
(Used in aviation, ISA+21 would mean that the atmosphere was 21 degrees above standard.)
 
We are non-profit organization that raises scholarship money to inspire future generations of women aviators via educational outreach. To date we have donated cash and type rating valued at over One Million Dollars. Our conferences and gatherings celebrate camaraderie and provide support in the aviation industry.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Our first convention/conference was in Las Vegas, Nevada in 1978.
Last year we were in Berlin, Germany!
 
2016 will be in Newport Beach, California.
Conference: May 10-12, 2016.
After conference side trip: May13-15, 2016
 
Always fun!
 
 
 
 
 
Slideshow
Conference Group Photos
 
 
 
 
 
 
We raise money for our scholarships
at our conferences through member
participation in a silent auction
(member funded) and donations.
 
Last year we gave away two B737NG Type,
1 A320NG Type and a
Multi-engine Instructor rating!
 
Many of our winners have been hired
by major carriers and that is our goal:
more women airline pilots!

ISA CHOSE EIGHT SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS IN 2015 and 2016!

 

 


We gave out four more type ratings this year, either Boeing 737 or Airbus NG. Congratulations everyone!
 
Here are this year's winners:

 

 
Inga Chalmers of Skywest (Tempe, Arizona, formerly from Russia)
 
Emma Farley of Shuttle America (New York, New York)
 
Carrie Regamey of Central Mountain Air (Calgary, Alberta Canada)
 
Diane Helly is a captain at ExpressJet. (Salt Lake City, UT)
 
Amanda Langer of Air Wisconsin (Norfolk VA) was a winner, but accepted a job with American Airlines. Congratulations!
 
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Karen Guadagni: We had a very competitive group of women to choose from last year for our scholarships.

All four candidates from 2015 passed their checkrides with glowing recommendations and rave reviews.

Multi-engine Instructor Rating 2015:

Lenka Kubina—Originally from the Czech Republic, now residing in Oakley, Utah.

Lenka is a flight instructor at Trans Pac Academy.

Type Ratings 2015:

Tanya Kletke—Winnipeg, Canada. Tanya is a captain for Perimeter Aviation. Boeing 737NG Type.  

Connie Nicholson—Phoenix, Arizona. Connie is a first officer at ExpressJet. Airbus 320NG Type.

Jennifer Johnson—Houston Texas. Jennifer is a first officer at ExpressJet. Boeing 737NG Type.

 

Job Openings in Dallas

 
               I am the Flight Operations Administrator for Martinaire Aviation, LLC.  Martinaire Aviation is a Part 135 air carrier based in Dallas, TX, performing both scheduled and ad-hoc cargo operations throughout the United States.  We are currently looking to hire pilots in several areas.  Contact me at this email, please:   careers@marinaire.com

Thank you,

Leah Kirkwood
Flight Ops Administrator
MARTINAIRE AVIATION, L.L.C.
4553 Glenn Curtiss Drive
Addison, Texas 75001
Tel: (972) 349-5703
Fax: (972) 349-5755

 

Beating the Odds

 
SIBA
 
KARA HATZAI
 
STARRING OUR VERY OWN ISA+21 MEMBER, Kara Hatzai!
Siba Gqirana is nominated to be the next person in The Chain of Betters.
 

Welcome Jalyn Wadden

 
Jalyn

 
 
My background is like many other pilots, I grew up fascinated with and in love with airplanes. At sixteen I soloed and from then on I was flying. I moved into the regionals and flew for seven years before I heard the rumblings of an international airline called Emirates. Emirates did a road show in Detroit and everyone in the crew room was buzzing with excitement that Emirates was hiring CRJ pilots to fly Boeing 777s and Airbus 330s and paid really well. It sounded like a dream come true, but the one catch was living in the Middle East in a place called Dubai. It seemed so far away, and although I traveled internationally a lot I had never been to the Middle East. My then husband, who is also a pilot decided we would go for it. Fast forward six years later and I am a 777 captain at the age of 31!

My overall experience with Dubai, the Middle East, and Emirates has been good. Although, there are problems with too much flying combined with being so far from home time-wise, I am happy with having taken the leap overseas.

When I was hired I was the twelfth female pilot out of almost 2,200 pilots and the recruitment team was happy to see a woman’s face. From day one of the interview and everyday since then I can honestly say my perception of working here as been that I have been treated as an equal, with no preferential treatment and no discrimination. One simple requirement: perform to our high standards, just do the job we expect from you as a professional pilot. That makes me so happy. Most of our pilot group are expatriates from all over the world, I think over 90 nationalities. The majority are from the UK, Australia, the US, South Africa, and of course the UAE.

Most of the pilots were just happy to have a change of face in the flight deck since Emirates didn't hire female pilots until 2007. Their first was Kalina, a Brazilian woman, who was also the first female pilot at Varig.
 
 
The women before me were excellent at what they do and paved a very nice path for me and the other women who were joining us. To this day, I have been treated fairly and equally at work and living in Dubai. Dubai living offers a lot and it is what you make of it.

Almost 80% of the city is expatriates and it makes it a very culturally diverse city. It is a clean, safe, and conservative city. Emiratis in general are very welcoming. As long as your behavior and clothing are conservative you will be problem free. Some of the stories you read are when people overstep the limits of living in a Muslim country, and I mean push the limits with things I would find offensive back home. You don't have to cover up, I wear my standard shorts, tank top, and flip flops almost everyday. Weekends you see women dressed up to the max in short dresses, heels, and full makeup. There are many bars, clubs, and places to relax and have a drink if you want. There are tons of sporting activities available such as surfing, paddle boarding, kitesurfing, scuba diving, volleyball, basketball, netball, soccer, the list goes on. Family activities include many parks, social events, indoor playgrounds all centered around kids and family. And of course, I have to mention music...tons of musicians come to the UAE for their world tours.

Almost six years later I still enjoy living in the Middle East. Again, the hardest part is being away from family and friends. It is not for everyone, but I believe it is worth a visit and taking a look at the city before making any decisions of what you think Dubai and flying in the Middle East.
 
Dubai
 
 
 

Female airline pilots wish more women would join them

 
 
 

 
ISA+21 Members Lisa Mrozek and Karen Guadagni are featured in this article.
 
 

 
 
Linda Friedman and Pam Perdue (below) are United Airline 787 Pilots
 
Linda Friedman and Pamela Perdue 
Click the picture above to read the story on the "United Hub."
 
All woman United crew 
All-woman crew headed by Captain Kimberly Noakes and First Officer Jann Lumbrazo flew the  737-900ER from Seattle’s Boeing Field to Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport.
 
 
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 Our own ISA member Stephanie Gates Sun 
 
The March/April issue of the 99 News has an article by our very own ISA member Stephanie Gates Sun.

 
 
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Need a new ISA pin?

New lapel pin
 
We have them in our ISA+21 store!
 
Bev pins Jenn
 
Beverley pins Jenn, the lead in the play, "Come From Away," with her old ISA pin!
 
(The woman captain featured in "Come From Away" is our own charter member and co-founder, Beverley Bass.)
 

Texas Woman's University Donations

 
Don't forget to donate your ISA or personal memorabilia!
 

It is important to know that either organizational or individual “gift agreements” are negotiable and tailored to your personal satisfaction.

The Woman’s Collection has devoted substantial resources to the history of women in aviation. Researchers, historians, educators, filmmakers, documentarians, and scholars find the TWU Woman’s Collection to be a rich and varied source of valuable information and visual resources. I have included suggestions on “What to Donate” to an organization’s collection or to your individual collection. See “We Want Your Story” under "Archives" in the main menu for more information about participating in TWU Libraries Oral History Program.

 

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me or Kimberly Johnson.

                                               

                 Kimberly Johnson, Coordinator,                    Captain Sandy Anderson (retired NW/Delta)

    Special Collections                                          ISWAP Liaison

      KJohnson27@twu.edu                                   archives@iswap.org

       940-898-3743                                                 901-619-7934 cell

 
 

 ISA+21 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

 
Chairwoman: Liz Jennings Clark
Vice Chairwoman: Tara Traynor Cook
Secretary: Eva Brock
Treasurer: Liana Hart
Membership: Glenys (Gar) Robison
Scholarship: Karen Guadagni
Education & Outreach: Kara Hatzai
Events: Linda Wright
Communications: Kathy McCullough
 
It is contrary to ISA policy to provide media commentary on accidents, incidents, politicians or
political positions. No member may present an opinion to the media representing ISA without authorization
from the Board of Directors.
 
Regarding requests for commentary on accidents or incidents in the aviation
community, the following language may be used:
 
“Our sympathy goes out to the family and friends of those involved in this terrible tragedy. Although I am an airline pilot, I'm not an accident investigator. It would be irresponsible for any of us to speculate on what has occurred. The NTSB will be investigating and providing updates on the progress of the
investigation.”

   
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